Archive for the 'US Games' category

Deck of Interest—Elle Qui Oracle

Oct 12 2019 Published by under Anna's Decks of Interest, US Games

How do you connect with your feminine power?

These 44 exquisite cards are meant to introduce you to your inner feminine strengths and wisdom. Their names come from around the world (Colette-She Who Nurtures, Conscia-She Who Whispers, Abanolaka-She Who Battles, Eclat-She Who Regrets, Kamala-She Who Emerges). The illustrations are state of the art digital, each one more beautiful than the last, combining fantasy and romance with classical foundations. The depicted ladies are physically perfect according to traditional, conservative standards of beauty. It is, however, the powerful energy that they transmit (most often conveyed by a direct gaze) that raises this deck from the realm of art to the realm of modern transcendence. The esoteric wisdom can be found in the accessories, be it jewelry, head dresses, flowers, tarot cards or daggers.

Don’t be misled by the glamour of the images. This deck delivers serious messages regarding women’s unfoldment. We are coming into a time when women can be pretty and relevant. If you’re interested in the spiritual overtones of the next generation of feminism, spend some time with these cards. You won’t be disappointed. SHOP FOR THE DECK

© 2019 Anna Jedrziewski and InannaWorks

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Deck of Interest—The Herbcrafter’s Tarot

Sep 06 2019 Published by under Anna's Decks of Interest, US Games

How do you use herbs?

Beginning with the premise that herbs are archetypes in botanical form, this deck builds on the traditional 78-card Rider-Waite-Smith tarot format to bring the magic of herbs into the hands of readers. Rather than documenting the properties associated with specific plants, this deck focuses on the relationships between people and plants. Dandelion shows us The Fool. Garlic teaches us about Strength. Rose shows us the heart of The Empress.

Joanna Powell Colbert’s illustrations are beautifully designed and rendered. They contain symbolism, captured in small details, that harkens back to Waite’s demanding standards. The cards respectfully reflect Latisha’s Mexican-American heritage and the Celtic heritage that she shares with Joanna. The companion book explains it all perfectly.

Whether you are a tarot reader, an herbalist, or someone who occasionally buys potted herbs in the grocery store, this is a deck that will brighten your world. SHOP FOR THE DECK

© 2019 Anna Jedrziewski and InannaWorks

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Deck of Interest—The Wonderland Tarot

Aug 16 2019 Published by under Anna's Decks of Interest, US Games

Have you been down this rabbit hole?

The world of oracle decks is suddenly filled with images of magical/mystical beings. In the midst of that, all things Alice in Wonderland are trending. I thought it was time to remind people of this cutting edge deck (originally published in 1989) which was re-released two years ago in US Games’ iconic small card/tin container format. Chris Abbey discovered Alice in early childhood and remains an enthusiastic fan. While this deck is anchored to the traditional 78-card Waite-Smith tarot format and the illustrations rely on Sir John Tenniel’s original Alice artwork, the imagery from there is all Wonderland magic at its best.

The new version retains the playing card indices in the borders making this a deck that can be used as either playing cards or tarot cards (an oracular crossover).

Chris Abbey suggests that users read Lewis Carroll’s original tale before they get too involved with this deck. I’m thinking that a lot of you will want to just take the plunge and follow Alice down the rabbit hole first and seek out Carroll’s classic work when you are ready to add the historic details. SHOP FOR THE DECK

© 2019 Anna Jedrziewski and InannaWorks

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Deck of Interest—Crow Tarot

Jul 27 2019 Published by under Anna's Decks of Interest, US Games

What does crow want to say to you?

Crow might not have the mystical allure of Eagle or Owl, but the truth is that Crow has much more interaction with mere mortals and, therefore, has much more impact on their lives. Cullinane fell under their spell in childhood and knew that they needed to be the anchor in her first tarot deck. It is a contract with the natural world that has served her well. The unique artistry of this deck has made it a bestseller since it first hit retailer’s shelves. And the appeal of the deck shows no signs of wearing off.

Dynamic, insightful, and sometimes showing a bit of tongue-in-cheek humor, the deck builds on the basic Rider-Waite-Smith format to add a new perspective to the classic symbolism of that landmark deck.

I started studying tarot in 1970. I may not have seen it all but I have seen more than enough of it. This deck broke through my jaded mindset to show me something new and exciting. If you love tarot, this is a deck you don’t want to miss. SHOP FOR THE DECK

© 2019 Anna Jedrziewski and InannaWorks

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Deck of Interest—Divine Feather Messenger

Apr 06 2019 Published by under Anna's Decks of Interest, US Games

Do you Find Feathers?

Many people who regularly do believe that they are messages from the divine realms. But how can we know what they are telling us? Even the most intuitive among us sometimes need a little bit of extra insight. And insight is exactly what this deck provides.

Alison DeNicola has selected 44 birds and paired them with affirmations that reflect each bird’s spiritual history and natural correspondences. David Scheirer’s captivating watercolors capture the physical plane essence of each bird in fluid detail. The reverse side of each card shows one enlarged feather from the bird depicted.

Together, the cards and book make a very special tool for divination, inspiration, or just for getting to know 44 very special bird species. SHOP FOR THE DECK

© 2019 Anna Jedrziewski and InannaWorks

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Deck of Interest—Raven’s Wand Oracle

Mar 16 2019 Published by under Anna's Decks of Interest, US Games

Have you been to Wildwood Coven?

With this amazing new oracle deck, Steven Hutton not only gives us a personal tour of the vibrant world of witchcraft he created for his Dark Raven Chronicles trilogy, but the 44 dynamic card illustrations he created have raised the bar for oracle fantasy art. Each card provides a magical environment that draws the reader in. The power of this deck, however, is the degree of animation and presence emanated by each living being in the cards.

And living beings abound. In addition to human and animal protagonists, the scenes are also filled with flying fish, mythical critters, fireflies, birds, ducklings, mini-dragons, raccoons, hogs, snakes, bunnies, wolves, and cats—-lots and lots of cats. Each of the beings seem to be inhabited by a strong, emotive personality that helps to convey the message of the protagonist.

Hutton’s intent is to convey the wisdom of witchcraft. He does that with energy that swirls within each card and hints of dark shadows without surrendering the high road. As an oracle it provides endless stimulation for intuitives. As a teacher of the craft, its lessons will be endless. SHOP FOR THE BOOK

© 2019 Anna Jedrziewski and InannaWorks

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Deck of Interest—Ask the Wise Fool®

Feb 22 2019 Published by under Anna's Decks of Interest, US Games

 



Do you have a question for the court jester?

When power becomes concentrated in the hands of a small group (or single person), the “yes-men” take over. When that happens, smart authoritarians invite a “Wise Fool” into their inner circle to ensure that somebody will speak the truth to them. These court jesters are traditionally given immunity in advance, so that they are free to tell the person in charge that they have become delusional. Roger von Oech has made a career out of being the person who points out the elephant in the room. And quite a successful career it is.

This 66-card deck and 96-page guidebook is his latest entry into the “let’s keep it real” arena. The cards are divided into three suits. CONTRARY STRATEGIES cards are designed to challenge groupthink and help readers get in touch with their creative core. CREATIVE STRATEGIES cards are meant to shift readers perspectives and help them look at things with new eyes. CAUTIONARY STRATEGIES cards counsel prudence in an unpredictable world.

Like von Oech, I have spent most of my adult life studying (and practicing) creative process. It appears that creativity is an idea whose time has come. Once again, US Games is at the head of the pack, helping von Oech to bring his wisdom to the public in this original and beautifully designed intuitive tool. SHOP FOR THE BOOK

© 2019 Anna Jedrziewski and InannaWorks

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Tarot from the Trenches™ — Learning with the cards

This is the original, unedited article Anna submitted to Retailing Insight. The Retailing Insight version misrepresents the intention of the original article, presenting it as oppositional rather than a shared journey.

What Do Your Customers Really WANT From Card Decks?

Most of us are aware that card decks have become increasingly popular over the past decade. Publishers have responded by reprinting classic decks and releasing new decks. The quality of new decks, with regard to both design and content, is incredible. But why are customers buying these decks? When someone walks into your store inquiring about decks, what do they really want and how can you help them find a product that makes them happy? There are as many answers to those questions as there are customers. That’s the magic of card decks. But how can you possibly meet all those customers’ needs, for their benefit and yours?

I believe that it’s a process and that it doesn’t lend itself to any one formula. If you want to capitalize on this trend you and your employees are going to need to do some work in order to understand what’s going on here. I think the best way I can be of help is to recount my own personal journey through card decks (specifically tarot decks). Hopefully it will help you and your staff get a better sense of how to connect with that “question mark” that walks into your store with a vague expectation that they’re not quite able to express.

I honestly don’t remember what triggered my interest in tarot cards, or even when it happened. It was some time in the early 70’s, at a time when tarot decks were not all that easy to come by. Because I had worked at New York University on Washington Square while I went to school there, I knew about Weiser’s Occult Bookstore on lower Broadway. When I decided that I must have a deck of tarot cards, that was where I headed. At that point in time, the Rider-Waite deck was the only consistently available deck, but as fate would have it, interest was developing in this almost lost art. Successful illustrator David Palladini had just created the Aquarian Tarot.


Still in print (U.S. Games Systems), it was and is an amazing interpretation of the ancient wisdom of the tarot. I fell in love with it at first sight. I took the deck home excitedly and sorted through it, using the brief instruction booklet that was included to try and figure out what it all meant.
Not long after, I returned to Weiser’s looking for more information on how to use the deck. I returned home with a copy of Eden’ Gray’s Mastering the Tarot (Signet). I was beginning to feel empowered. I began doing tarot readings for friends. I used the basic Celtic Cross Spread (illustrated in many tarot decks and books). I had the “querent” (questioner/victim?) pick a court card that they felt represented them. That was “The Significator”. It was placed in the center of the table in front of us. Then I shuffled the deck to rid it of accumulated outside vibrations. Next I asked the querent to shuffle the deck to get their vibrations aligned with it. Then I asked them to cut the deck into three piles, using their left hand, moving to their left. I asked them to repeat this process three times in total. All of this is what I call “The Preparatory Ritual”.

Working from the top of the deck, I then turned up cards one at a time to create the tarot spread (layout). The first card was placed on top of “The Significator” and described the situation the querent wanted insight into. The second card was placed horizontally over the first card, describing a secondary aspect of the question at hand, either parallel or in opposition to the first aspect. Next I placed a card to the left. representing influences that had been active and were currently dissipating. This was followed by a card to the right, representing influences that were just beginning to influence the question. Then a card was placed beneath the center cards, representing the foundation of the situation in question. Next a card was placed above the center card to indicate the potential/possible outcomes of the situation. The next four cards were placed to the right of the existing cards, from bottom to top. I always considered these cards to be secondary or explanatory to the spread. The bottom card represented the querent in the situation. The second card up represented people around the querent, both positive and negative. The third card up represented the querent’s ideals or fears with regard to the situation. The top card was an overview of the outcome. Not “the answer” but a description of what the outcome might look like if things continued as they were currently moving.

In those early days, I would lay out the spread and read the interpretation of each card from Mastering the Tarot. Once I finished reading, I would sit back and look at the whole picture and try and make some sense of it for the querent. These early attempts at card reading were met with a certain degree of success and I was excited about my prospects as a seerer.

Then I had a friend, who had just been married, ask for a reading about the future of her relationship. I went through the process that by now had become familiar, and was horrified as I turned up one negative card after another. There wasn’t a “happy” card in the spread. Rattled, I made an excuse about not understanding what I was seeing, and swiftly removed the cards from sight. The relationship ended in less than six months. This was followed by a few more “inauspicious” layouts which turned out as the cards ”predicted”. I put my cherished Aquarian Tarot in a drawer and told people I was out of the fortune telling business.

I did, however, continue to explore metaphysics and eventually I was led to a small Christian Spiritualist church on the west coast of Florida. That area was, for awhile, a hotbed of spiritualism. I discovered it at the tail end of its popularity. I sought out similar groups in Manhattan, which led me back to the tarot and the realization that the tarot images were actually a visual bible intended to pass on esoteric wisdom to those who were ready to understand what they were seeing in the cards. That was when my serious relationship with the tarot began.

I bought a Rider-Waite deck (U.S. Games) and a copy of A.E. Waite’s The Pictorial Key to The Tarot (Dover Publications). The world that opened up to me changed my life and my career.

I realized that events in my life that I had struggled with were steps along the path of an initiate. I continued my studies with Paul Foster Cases’ Book of Tokens (Builders of The Adytum Ltd.). Case taught me that the tarot had correspondences to astrology and Hebrew Kabbalistic teaching. I learned that there were myriad paths to the higher wisdom (which explains the current multitude of tarot decks), each depicting the path of the person who experienced and recorded it.

By the early 90’s, metaphysics and the science of spirituality had become the primary focus of my life. I returned to one-on-one consultations and began teaching. Tarot was becoming a hot topic and I created a series of tarot evenings which discussed one Major Arcana card at a time. (Traditional tarot is divided into 22 Major Arcana cards, which are always illustrated, and 56 Lesser Arcana cards, divided into four suits, which are sometimes illustrated and sometimes just contain simple formatted designs.) Those first tarot evenings began with a lecture on the established interpretations of the card, followed by a meditation on the card with channeled (information sent from disembodied guides on the Other Side) feedback and discussion.

In my search for more background information on the cards, I discovered Meditations on the Tarot (Tarcher)which was written anonymously by a scholarly member of a religious order in Europe. This monk or priest used the imagery for each Major Arcana card as the basis for a lengthy discussion of philosophy, psychology, Western esoteric history, Hebrew Kabbalistic teaching, and Eastern spiritual teaching and practice. It remains an unprecedented compendium of insight into the Major Arcana images and the power that they continue to wield.

When I began to use the tarot for teaching spiritual/esoteric wisdom, I solidified my relationship with A. E. Waite and the original Rider-Waite deck. I consider him to be a clear-eyed initiate into the Western mysteries who thoroughly educated himself with regard to correlated teachings. The Rider-Waite deck was my go-to deck for teaching. (I explored many of the new decks coming out and used them for lighter events such as Message Circles.)

I am grateful to U.S. Games for delving into the substantial input that illustrator Pamela Colman Smith had in helping Waite create his classic deck. The Borderless Smith-Waite Tarot Deck which U.S. Games recently released highlights Smith’s illustrations, giving them their due. It has become my new go-to deck for all purposes.

Waite was not alone in his interest in the tarot. (Stuart Kaplan, of U.S. Games, has documented the roots and history of tarot in unparalleled detail in his four-volume The Encyclopedia of Tarot).

The other major figure who has survived the test of time is, of course, Aleister Crowley, The Grand Beast. His Thoth Tarot (U.S. Games) continues to be a best seller.

I personally feel that Crowley’s images sacrifice substance for theatricality, but you won’t have to look far in order to find someone who disagrees with me. The fact that the deck is sometimes said to contain doorways to the dark side only increases its popularity. In any case, it’s a deck you will want to become familiar with if you are talking to the public about tarot.

On a lighter note, major esoteric publisher, Llewellyn has parlayed its solid foundation in the world of all things occult into the creation of innovative, often whimsical, new card decks. Case in point, the Before Tarot and After Tarot decks (Lo Scarabeo/Llewellyn)capture the familiar tarot snapshots just before and just after they were recorded for posterity. It’s a lively discussion starter for group work. It’s also an indication that ancient systems of philosophy only have value if they can capture the attention of the current generation.

In the last couple of decades, tarot has increasingly become associated with Carl Jung and the modern therapeutic philosophies that he paved the way for. Tarot publishers are now creating product lines that reflect this trend. I’ve read a lot about tarot in the last 50 years and not much that’s being written currently holds my interest for very long. One notable exception is Tarot at a Crossroads (Schiffer Publishing). It’s co-written by a therapist and an intuitive specializing in tarot. It presents tarot as a tool for helping people to reclaim their lives, rather than a means for the reader to gain power and status. True shamans are members of their tribe, often living on the edge of the group, but existing to serve the tribe in surviving and adapting. The best tarot readers perform that service, with humility and, when necessary, subservience.

The best way you can be of service to your customers is to explore card decks (tarot and otherwise) and to find the meaning that they have for you. Most of the major mind/body/spirit publishers are publishing card decks now and they are all amazing in their own way. Decks such as The Lunar Nomad Oracle (Weiser Books), Doreen Virtue’s fabulous series of angel decks (Hay House), Shamanic Power Animal Oracle Cards (Findhorn Press), and The Wild Unknown Tarot (HarperElixir) have moved into new territories and broadened the customer base. I suggest that people let their Inner Child pick their card decks for them. Leave the left brain out of it and go with what makes you happy. The Inner Child remembers joy (regardless of how deeply it is buried) and it is joy that ultimately connects us to a Higher Power — and why shouldn’t a box of pretty, intriguing pictures be the path that takes us there.

Anna Jedrziewski is a new consciousness author and lecturer and creator of TarotWise.com. Tarot From The Trenches™ posts monthly on TarotWise.com.

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What is LENORMAND?

By the beginning of the 19th Century, Mademoiselle Marie-Anne Adelaide Lenormand had become the premier prophetess of Paris. Known as the Sybil on Rue de Tournon, she welcomed rich and poor into her salon/bookstore for more than fifty years. She predicted King Louis XVI’s violent death, as well as Napoleon’s eventual defeat in a wintry foreign land. Her specialty was reading 36 small-sized playing cards (a deck known as petit jeu) upon which she had scribbled drawings. It is said that there never was one, definitive Lenormand deck created by Mademoiselle. Rather, observers noted that the images on the cards changed often. What stayed the same was the accuracy of her readings and the fame which it brought her.

After her death in 1843, there was no shortage of people trying to figure out how to capitalize on her name. A German deck of 36 small-sized playing cards with illustrations on them, known as The Game of Hope, began to be marketed as Petit Lenormand. Soon there were Lenormand decks around the world, each with its own imagery and system of interpretation, all claiming to carry on Mademoiselle Lenormand’s successful legacy.

With the current revival of interest in oracle/divination decks, Lenormand decks have once again gained popular success and begun to spawn variations of themselves with increasing speed. Tarot afficionados in particular seem to be feel the need to explore Lenormand, even though Lenormand is traditionally read with literal interpretations based on the card image and its placement in a spread. (Tarot is best used as a guide for intuitive musings.)

Creators of modern Lenormand decks are finding ways to add layers of symbolism to each card within the limitations which traditional Lenormand demands. The smaller size of the cards is a challenge for illustrators, but many readers find them easier to work with, especially for large spreads. The latest craze is to find interesting ways to use both tarot and Lenormand in the same reading.

Most of us found that once we opened a Lenormand deck, just to see what all the fuss was about, there was no turning back. There is something undeniably dynamic about the system. Opening a well executed Lenormand deck can fill the room with scenes of Victorian parlors and mysterious women reading tea leaves and coffee grounds — perhaps with the spirit of Mademoiselle herself.

I’ve become a fan. Let me introduce you to some of my favorite Lenormand books and decks.


The Complete Lenormand
Oracle Handbook

Reading the Language and
Symbols of the Cards

Caitlin Matthews
ISBN 978-1-62055-325-1
Destiny Books
Matthews confidently walks readers through the intricacies of reading the less complex illustrations and fixed meanings of the Petit Lenormand. Chapter Two provides detailed information for interpreting each card, including key combinations with other cards, as well as the ways in which Lenormand symbolism differs from tarot symbolism. Each subsequent chapter adds another layer of nuance. By the end of the book, readers will be thoroughly schooled in the advanced subtleties of this complex divination system. Throughout, Matthews encourages readers to develop their own techniques and to make the cards their own.

Lenormand Cartomancy
Christopher Butler
ISBN 978-0-7643-4562-3
Schiffer Publishing
Butler begins the companion book for this deck and book set by acknowledging that the deck was spuriously attributed to Mlle. Lenormand after her death. but suggesting that she was first and foremost a masterful showwoman who would relish the fact that it has so successfully continued to enhance her fame. In updating the Petit Lenormand images, Butler does not believe that he is passing on the secrets of one of the greatest fortune tellers in history. Instead he intends to pay homage to her memory and her legend — and this he does brilliantly. The cards are modern, edgy, and visually stimulating.


Fairy Tale Lenormand
Art by Lisa Hunt
Written by Arwen Lynch
ISBN 978-1-57281-797-5
U.S.Games Systems, Inc.
To ask Lisa Hunt to illustrate a traditional Lenormand deck was really throwing down the gauntlet. But she rose to the challenge and created a deck which is straightforward enough to satisfy the most demanding traditional cartomancer, but also contains the tiny embedded symbolism her loyal fans look forward to. Those who choose to look closely, will find that the lady in Clover seems to have a blissful secret the rest of us cannot see. We expect the face emerging from the trunk in Tree but what about those roots reaching out like octopus arms to grasp the ground. Arwen Lynch does a superb job of linking an appropriate fairy tale to each card and explaining how the archetypes in the tale lend themselves to the Lenormand symbolism. This is a lyrical and captivating addition to the Lenormand library.


Fairy Lenormand Oracle Cards
Created by Markus Katz
and Tali Goodwin
Artwork by Davide Corsi
SBN 978-0-738746-95-1
Lo Scarabeo
The Lenormand phenomenon moves to a new level as the 36 cartomantic images enter the realm of enchantment. The Fae Folk add their own special magic to the cards and Davide Corsi’s lush illustrations capture that special energy as the fairies combine with woodlands, wildlife, flowers, ritual tools, ornate vessels, and secret cottages. Exquisite creatures appear in carefully detailed, exotic environments as each traditional card image is brought to life in a new and dynamic way. The companion guidebook provides traditional meanings for each image plus tips and hints for reading with the cards. If you read intuitively, you’ll find that the images are powerful triggers for a flood of astral information. This deck, which is as much about the fairy world as it is about Lenormand, is a treat for the eyes (be it two or three) no matter how you use it.


Maybe Lenormand
Ryan Edward
ISBN 978-1-57281-833-0
U.S. Games Systems, Inc.
Edward honors traditional Lenormand with highly creative, updated versions of the original 36 cards, then adds 16 additional cards in order to end up with a standard 52-card deck. The result meets the needs of those who do readings with standard playing cards and those who are wedded to the Lenormand images. Readers can work traditionally by using just the first 36 cards. Novices can do the same to get a sense of how Lenormand readings work. The more adventurous can throw caution to the wind and use the whole deck with its eclectic add-ons to see what the fates will say. The 72-page, full-color companion book in this beautifully-designed box set contains instructions for reading Lenormand, and for using Lenormand’s classic Grand Tableau spread. Altogether it’s a wonderful gift for those who read, or want to read, Lenormand — or for those who want an interesting, artsy deck to play solitaire with.

Egyptian Lenormand
Wisdom from an Ancient Empire
Created by Nefer Khepri
ISBN 978-0-7643-4776-4
Schiffer Publishing
Channeled from ancient Egyptian gods and goddesses, this 41-card deck combines wisdom from the ancient world with the popular Lenormand system of cartomancy. Created by artist, mystic, and Reiki master Khepri, the illustrations are highly animated. If you hold them for awhile you will begin to sense a slight buzzing surrounding them. The energy which Khepri has instilled in them can be activated for healing or for ritual/manifestation work. The 176-page companion book contains full-color illustrations of each card along with in-depth interpretations of its meaning and uses in healing and magical workings.


Pixie’s Astounding Lenormand
Created by Edmund Zebrowski
ISBN 978-1-57281-805-7
U.S. Games Systems Inc.
Comprised of illustrations from the Rider-Waite tarot and The Green Sheaf, this 36-card petit Lenormand pays homage to Pamela Colman Smith. Fundamentally a series of collages pieced together from Smith’s artwork, they add layers of meaning to the simple Lenormand images. For those who are familiar with Smith’s work, each card is a little mystery to be solved and built upon. Fun, thought-provoking, and already a sensation on the web, this small deck is a treat for beginners and seasoned diviners alike.


Easy Lenormand
Quick Answers to Everyday Questions
Marcus Katz & Tali Goodwin
ISBN 978-0-7387-4712-5
Llewellyn Publications
These oracle-deck afficionados take us on a tour of the classic Lenormand deck with spectacular results. Using the traditional 36 cards, they start at the beginning and show novices and experienced diviners alike how it’s done.This is a fun and comfortable way for everyone to get acquainted with this historic deck. The 150-page companion book spells it all out, clearly and specifically. Best for people who don’t already have a relationship with the cards, readers can start at the beginning and work their way up to professional, gypsy-style parlor fortune telling. Fun for everyone, if you’re not afraid of the truth!?


Dreaming Way Lenormand
Artwork by Kwon Shina
Written by Lynn Araujo
ISBN 978-1-57281-758-6
US Games Systems, Inc.
Kwon Shina has added a new dimension to the very popular Lenormand divination system. I loved her Dreaming Way Tarot deck. She’s delivered once again with this quirky, lyrical interpretation of the 36 Lenormand cards, advancing their power as an oracle. The accompanying 96-page booklet adds insight for those who are still new to Lenormand interpretation. Seasoned intuitives will most likely just open the box and let these powerful new illustrations take them to new heights.


Gilded Reverie Lenormand
Ciro Marchetti
ISBN 978-1-57281-754-8
U.S. Games Systems Inc.
Ciro Marchetti has wedded the Petit Lenormand images with Madame Lenormand’s fluid approach to cartomancy and reverently created this superb divination deck. The images are stunning — reminiscent of elaborately illustrated children’s books. The evocative imagery produces nearly tangible sensations as one looks through the deck, pondering the layers of symbolism contained within it. The 48-page companion booklet offers Marchetti’s expressive, personal insight into the meaning of each card. A beautiful deck, beautifully packaged.


Under the Roses Lenormand
Kendra Hurteau
Katrina Hill
ISBN 978-1-57281-760-9
US Games Systems, Inc.
Visually, this 39-card version of the Petit Lenormand echoes old-fashioned illustration and border design, but the use of soft color with vibrant highlights adds a distinctly modern-day edge. The energy emanating from each of the pictures is palpable and dynamic.The 56-page companion booklet contains brief introductions to Sub Rosa and the Petit Lenormand, keyword interpretations of each card, sample spreads, and advanced techniques for working with the cards. There are esoteric layers to each of these cards. Once novices have built up confidence doing card readings, they will move to the inner realms to communicate directly with the cards and — perhaps — with the Madame herself.


Pagan Lenormand Oracle Cards
Gina M. Pace
Artwork by Franco Rivolli
ISBN 978-0-7387-435-47
Lo Scarabeo
This innovative deck combines the ritual, nature-based spirituality, and inclusiveness of paganism with the traditional imagery of a Lenormand deck. That imagery has been updated without sacrificing the long-standing symbolism of Lenormand. Readers will find potato chips, koi, and a Book of Shadows. My favorite card is 29-Garden with its magenta labyrinth. This deck is a terrific tool for learning about paganism and experiencing Lenormand cartomancy.

Read more of Anna’s reviews as well as her weekly and monthly Tarotcasts™ on TarotWise.com.

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Deck of Interest—Fairy Tale Lenormand

Sep 15 2016 Published by under Anna's Decks of Interest, US Games

U.S.GamesSystems, Inc.

Do you know how to read Lenormand?

To ask Lisa Hunt to illustrate a traditional Lenormand deck was really throwing down the gauntlet. Yet, once again, she rose to the challenge, with a wink and a nod, and created a deck which appears straightforward enough to satisfy the most demanding traditional cartomancer, but also contains the tiny embedded symbolism her loyal fans look forward to.

Lenormand is not tarot. It is meant to be read precisely, based on the predominant symbolism and the placement of cards. Ms. Hunt’s drawings meet that criteria nicely. Those who choose to look closer, however, will find that the lady in Clover seems to have a blissful secret the rest of us cannot see. Then there’s Tree. Of course, we expect the face emerging from the trunk, but what about those roots reaching out like octopus arms to grasp the ground.

Arwen Lynch does a superb job of linking the appropriate Fairy Tale to each card and explaining how the archetypes in the tale lend themselves to the Lenormand symbolism.

This is a lyrical and captivating addition to the Lenormand library. Contained in a beautifully designed metal box, it’s a special treat for card lovers and the people who love us. SHOP FOR THE DECK

© 2016 Anna Jedrziewski and InannaWorks.com

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